Friday, February 6, 2009

The Porn Mustache vs. The Wrestler

I saw The Wrestler, starring Mickey Rourke, the other night and it reminded me of John Stossel's brief interview of David Schultz. Here it is for your viewing pleasure.


My only question is: Why does Stossel still sport the Harry Reems mustache after all these year? The 1970's are over dude. Not even Harry Reems has a Harry Reems mustache anymore.


As for the film The Wrestler, it was quite good. I used to go to professional wrestling matches when I was eleven-years-old, and it didn't take long to figure out that it was fake. Fake as far as the matches are all predetermined, and these guys are, for the most part, friends outside the ring. One of my hints was realizing that the "good guy" and "bad guy" dressing room doors opened into the same big back room. That and just watching closely and realizing that, if they were really enacting some of these moves, a lot of professional wrestlers would end up dead. But the truth is that these guys inflict a lot of punishment on themselves to heighten the realism. There is a scene in The Wrestler when Randy "The Ram" Robinson intentionally cuts his forehead with a razor blade that he had hidden before the match. I remember seeing Lou Albano in interviews and noticing all the tiny scars on his forehead. These guys remind me of side show geeks, who will stick pins through various parts of their body to make a few bucks. Mickey Rourke gives a great performance in The Wrestler, which wouldn't have been half as good without his presence. I couldn't imagine anyone else doing the role. I tried to picture Tom Cruise taking on the role, but couldn't do it. As the film begins, Randy has burned all his bridges, and when he suffers a heart attack he realizes that he has no one to reach out to. Marisa Tomei plays a stripper in a club that "The Ram" frequents, and Rourke's character tries to connect with her as more than just a customer when he senses that the end is near. Rourke transforms Robinson, a faded star at the end of his career and possibly his life, into a sympathetic character that the audience urges to get his life back on track. Rourke will probably not take home the coveted Oscar®, for which he is nominated, but I'm hoping that this role will mean more quality work from him in the near future.

1 comment:

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